The Difference Between Inpatient, Outpatient and Intensive Outpatient Treatment

With all the pressure of admitting to having a substance abuse problem, choosing detoxification and treatment, individuals who suffer from drug or alcohol addiction know that rehab is just a stone-throw away. Yet many pass the option to regain their normal lives and postpone educating themselves about available treatment options. Money, state of mind, and obligations are all things that deter people from taking that step to see what options are available for them. Words like inpatient and outpatient are often mentioned in rehab facility pamphlets and websites, but to many people these are just words. The meaning behind them is often not included or clear, making the decision-making process lack direction.

It is of vital importance when trying to rehabilitate from substance abuse, that people choose the right rehab center to match their needs. This means learning about the different treatment services and programs offered at a particular addiction treatment center.

Starting with inpatient rehab settings, there are a few notable features that should be known. The first thing to consider with an inpatient setting is whether or not detoxification needs to be monitored by healthcare professionals. Those suffering from chemical dependency Intensive Outpatient Program Atlanta GA, such as from heroin abuse, will often need an inpatient setting because of the way the body has now become dependent on the drug. Serious cases of detoxification from heroin can result in death if not overseen or facilitated with medically administered drugs that help ease the body slowly from the drug. Inpatient settings do offer several forms of therapy as well. Often, a therapist will work one-on-one with a patient to help combat the serious withdrawal symptoms and deep-rooted addiction problems.

In contrast, Intensive Outpatient Program Atlanta GA settings are a little more flexible

In this scenario, patients who are not in danger while in detoxification have the option to live in a halfway house, or in the setting of their own home. It is more common for patients to join a 12 step program like AA or other peer-support group, instead of one-on-one therapy. Patients can choose from living at home, or in a halfway house and are allowed to keep a job. Outpatient care is also much cheaper than inpatient care for obvious reasons that include the absence of medical staff and medical procedures, other than therapy. Although it is cheaper, choosing an outpatient setting is a very serious matter. It is important that whoever is making the choice understand the depths and strength of their addiction. Even though outpatient may seem like a more stable environment on the account of being able to remain home and continue normal life, it can be a double-edged sword. It is widely accepted that it is better for an addict’s daily routine to be broken, rather than negotiated. Outpatient programs can provide excellent care for individuals with great will power, but for others it is a temptation waiting to happen.

Also to be discussed-are intensive outpatient settings. This option does not differ greatly from outpatient settings, but there are some distinctions worth pointing out. The choice between residence options is available. In this setting, patients are offered from 10 to 12 hours of service a week. Other than these periods, either in the morning or the end of the day, patients are able to carry on with their normal lives. IOP is a short-term endeavor, utilizing cognitive behavioral therapy in order to manage emotional or psychological distress; it is not for severe cases of addiction because it focuses more on relapse prevention and mental stability, rather than coping with unbearable withdrawal symptoms. IOP is recommended to those who have fair control over themselves and their actions. Again, as mentioned before, it is extremely important to consider the strength of the addiction before choosing this option.

 

 

Health & Fitness

Leave a Reply

Comment
Name*
Mail*
Website*